Monday, 13 October 2008

And I'm Back!

Yes, yes I am. After nearly a three month disappearing act, I'm back in blogdom. What made me come back? Some big event taking a hold of my life? No, nothing quite that dramatic. I'm just here 'cause I have exams going on and I'm skilfully dodging the books. Plus I'm trying to convince myself that since I have my Computer exam tomorrow, sitting in front of a computer counts as studying. Well it should!

Anyway, I have nothing to write about personal events except that I hate exams and I hate having to pretend to be studying. I read something interesting in yesterday's issue of YA! paper (yes, I like reading children's' newspapers. So?). The cover story focused on some really spooky coincidences that have taken place throughout history and I thought some of them were pretty good. So here you go.

Seeing Double

A German mother who photographed her infant son in 1914 left the film to be developed at a store in Strasbourg. In those days some film plates were sold individually. World War I broke out and unable to return to Strasbourg, the woman gave up the picture for lost. Two years later, she bought a film plate in Frankfurt, over 100 miles away to take a picture of her newborn daughter. When developed, the film turned out to be a double exposure, with the picture of her daughter superimposed on the earlier picture of her son. Through some incredible twist of fate, her original film, never developed, had been mislabeled as unused, and had eventually been resold to her.

Childhood Book

While American novelist Anne Parrish was browsing bookstores in Paris in the 1920s, she came upon a book that was one of her childhood favourites - Jack Frost and Other Stories. She picked up the old book and showed it to her husband, telling him about the book she fondly remembered as a child. Her husband took the book, opened it, and on the flyleaf found the inscription "Anne Parrish, 209 N Weber Street, Colorado Springs." It was Anne's very own book.

Poe Puzzle

In the 19th century, the famous horror writer, Edgar Allan Poe, wrote a book called The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym. It was about four survivors of a shipwreck who were in an open boat for many days before they decided to kill and eat the cabin boy whose name was Richard Parker.
Some years later, in 1884, the yawl, Mignonette, foundered, with only four survivors, who were in an open boat for many days. Eventually the three senior members of the crew killed and ate the cabin boy. The name of the cabin boy was Richard Parker.

Taxi Trouble

In 1975, while riding a moped in Bermuda, a man was accidentally struck and killed by a taxi. One year later, this man's brother was killed in the very same way. In fact, he was riding the very same moped. And to stretch the odds even further, the very same taxi driven by the very same driver - and even carrying the very same passenger struck him!

Mirror Images



The twin brothers, Jim Lewis and Jim Springer, were separated at birth, adopted by different families. Unknown to each others, both families named the boys James. Both James grew up not knowing of the other, yet both sought law enforcement training, both had abilities in mechanical drawing and carpentry, and each had married women named Linda. Both had sons, one of whom was named James Alan and the other named James Allan. The twin brothers also divorced their wives and married other women - both named Betty. And they both owned dogs which they named Toy.

Crowning Glory

In Monza, Italy, King Umberto I, went to a small restaurant for dinner, accompanied by his aide-de-camp., General Emilio Ponzia-Vaglia. When the owner took King Umberto's order, the King noticed that he and the restaurant owner were virtual doubles, in face and in build. Both men began discussing the striking resemblance between each other and found many more similiarities.
1. Both men were born on the same day of the same year, March 14, 1844.
2. Both men had been born in the same town.
3. Both men married a woman with the same name, Margherita.
4. The restaurateur opened his restaurant on the same day that King Umberot was crowned King of Italy.
5. On July 29, 1900, King Umberto was informed that the restaurateur had died that day in a mysterious shooting accident, and as he expressed his regret, an anarchist in the crowd assassinated him

And finally...

Revenge Killing

IN 1883, Henry Ziegland broke off a relationship with his girlfriend who committed suicide. The girl's enraged brother hunted down Ziegland and shot him. Believing he had killed Ziegland, the brother then took his own life. However Ziegland had not been killed. The bullet had only grazed his face, lodging into a tree. It was a narrow escape. Years later, Ziegland decided to cut down the same tree, which still had the bullet in it. The huge tree seemed so formiddable that he decided to blow it up with dynamite. The explosion propelled the bullet into Ziegland's head, killing him.

2 comments:

tanuj lakhina said...

Its good to see you back and as always you brought with yourself a very interesting post. Very strange "coincidences" in there.

And oh, Welcome back. :)

Yes, yes I am. After nearly a three month disappearing act, I'm back in blogdom. What made me come back? Some big event taking a hold of my life? No, nothing quite that dramatic. I'm just here 'cause I have exams going on and I'm skilfully dodging the books. Plus I'm trying to convince myself that since I have my Computer exam tomorrow, sitting in front of a computer counts as studying. Well it should!

Anyway, I have nothing to write about personal events except that I hate exams and I hate having to pretend to be studying. I read something interesting in yesterday's issue of YA! paper (yes, I like reading children's' newspapers. So?). The cover story focused on some really spooky coincidences that have taken place throughout history and I thought some of them were pretty good. So here you go.

Seeing Double

A German mother who photographed her infant son in 1914 left the film to be developed at a store in Strasbourg. In those days some film plates were sold individually. World War I broke out and unable to return to Strasbourg, the woman gave up the picture for lost. Two years later, she bought a film plate in Frankfurt, over 100 miles away to take a picture of her newborn daughter. When developed, the film turned out to be a double exposure, with the picture of her daughter superimposed on the earlier picture of her son. Through some incredible twist of fate, her original film, never developed, had been mislabeled as unused, and had eventually been resold to her.

Childhood Book

While American novelist Anne Parrish was browsing bookstores in Paris in the 1920s, she came upon a book that was one of her childhood favourites - Jack Frost and Other Stories. She picked up the old book and showed it to her husband, telling him about the book she fondly remembered as a child. Her husband took the book, opened it, and on the flyleaf found the inscription "Anne Parrish, 209 N Weber Street, Colorado Springs." It was Anne's very own book.

Poe Puzzle

In the 19th century, the famous horror writer, Edgar Allan Poe, wrote a book called The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym. It was about four survivors of a shipwreck who were in an open boat for many days before they decided to kill and eat the cabin boy whose name was Richard Parker.
Some years later, in 1884, the yawl, Mignonette, foundered, with only four survivors, who were in an open boat for many days. Eventually the three senior members of the crew killed and ate the cabin boy. The name of the cabin boy was Richard Parker.

Taxi Trouble

In 1975, while riding a moped in Bermuda, a man was accidentally struck and killed by a taxi. One year later, this man's brother was killed in the very same way. In fact, he was riding the very same moped. And to stretch the odds even further, the very same taxi driven by the very same driver - and even carrying the very same passenger struck him!

Mirror Images



The twin brothers, Jim Lewis and Jim Springer, were separated at birth, adopted by different families. Unknown to each others, both families named the boys James. Both James grew up not knowing of the other, yet both sought law enforcement training, both had abilities in mechanical drawing and carpentry, and each had married women named Linda. Both had sons, one of whom was named James Alan and the other named James Allan. The twin brothers also divorced their wives and married other women - both named Betty. And they both owned dogs which they named Toy.

Crowning Glory

In Monza, Italy, King Umberto I, went to a small restaurant for dinner, accompanied by his aide-de-camp., General Emilio Ponzia-Vaglia. When the owner took King Umberto's order, the King noticed that he and the restaurant owner were virtual doubles, in face and in build. Both men began discussing the striking resemblance between each other and found many more similiarities.
1. Both men were born on the same day of the same year, March 14, 1844.
2. Both men had been born in the same town.
3. Both men married a woman with the same name, Margherita.
4. The restaurateur opened his restaurant on the same day that King Umberot was crowned King of Italy.
5. On July 29, 1900, King Umberto was informed that the restaurateur had died that day in a mysterious shooting accident, and as he expressed his regret, an anarchist in the crowd assassinated him

And finally...

Revenge Killing

IN 1883, Henry Ziegland broke off a relationship with his girlfriend who committed suicide. The girl's enraged brother hunted down Ziegland and shot him. Believing he had killed Ziegland, the brother then took his own life. However Ziegland had not been killed. The bullet had only grazed his face, lodging into a tree. It was a narrow escape. Years later, Ziegland decided to cut down the same tree, which still had the bullet in it. The huge tree seemed so formiddable that he decided to blow it up with dynamite. The explosion propelled the bullet into Ziegland's head, killing him.

Parinita said...

Thank you :-)

Yes, yes I am. After nearly a three month disappearing act, I'm back in blogdom. What made me come back? Some big event taking a hold of my life? No, nothing quite that dramatic. I'm just here 'cause I have exams going on and I'm skilfully dodging the books. Plus I'm trying to convince myself that since I have my Computer exam tomorrow, sitting in front of a computer counts as studying. Well it should!

Anyway, I have nothing to write about personal events except that I hate exams and I hate having to pretend to be studying. I read something interesting in yesterday's issue of YA! paper (yes, I like reading children's' newspapers. So?). The cover story focused on some really spooky coincidences that have taken place throughout history and I thought some of them were pretty good. So here you go.

Seeing Double

A German mother who photographed her infant son in 1914 left the film to be developed at a store in Strasbourg. In those days some film plates were sold individually. World War I broke out and unable to return to Strasbourg, the woman gave up the picture for lost. Two years later, she bought a film plate in Frankfurt, over 100 miles away to take a picture of her newborn daughter. When developed, the film turned out to be a double exposure, with the picture of her daughter superimposed on the earlier picture of her son. Through some incredible twist of fate, her original film, never developed, had been mislabeled as unused, and had eventually been resold to her.

Childhood Book

While American novelist Anne Parrish was browsing bookstores in Paris in the 1920s, she came upon a book that was one of her childhood favourites - Jack Frost and Other Stories. She picked up the old book and showed it to her husband, telling him about the book she fondly remembered as a child. Her husband took the book, opened it, and on the flyleaf found the inscription "Anne Parrish, 209 N Weber Street, Colorado Springs." It was Anne's very own book.

Poe Puzzle

In the 19th century, the famous horror writer, Edgar Allan Poe, wrote a book called The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym. It was about four survivors of a shipwreck who were in an open boat for many days before they decided to kill and eat the cabin boy whose name was Richard Parker.
Some years later, in 1884, the yawl, Mignonette, foundered, with only four survivors, who were in an open boat for many days. Eventually the three senior members of the crew killed and ate the cabin boy. The name of the cabin boy was Richard Parker.

Taxi Trouble

In 1975, while riding a moped in Bermuda, a man was accidentally struck and killed by a taxi. One year later, this man's brother was killed in the very same way. In fact, he was riding the very same moped. And to stretch the odds even further, the very same taxi driven by the very same driver - and even carrying the very same passenger struck him!

Mirror Images



The twin brothers, Jim Lewis and Jim Springer, were separated at birth, adopted by different families. Unknown to each others, both families named the boys James. Both James grew up not knowing of the other, yet both sought law enforcement training, both had abilities in mechanical drawing and carpentry, and each had married women named Linda. Both had sons, one of whom was named James Alan and the other named James Allan. The twin brothers also divorced their wives and married other women - both named Betty. And they both owned dogs which they named Toy.

Crowning Glory

In Monza, Italy, King Umberto I, went to a small restaurant for dinner, accompanied by his aide-de-camp., General Emilio Ponzia-Vaglia. When the owner took King Umberto's order, the King noticed that he and the restaurant owner were virtual doubles, in face and in build. Both men began discussing the striking resemblance between each other and found many more similiarities.
1. Both men were born on the same day of the same year, March 14, 1844.
2. Both men had been born in the same town.
3. Both men married a woman with the same name, Margherita.
4. The restaurateur opened his restaurant on the same day that King Umberot was crowned King of Italy.
5. On July 29, 1900, King Umberto was informed that the restaurateur had died that day in a mysterious shooting accident, and as he expressed his regret, an anarchist in the crowd assassinated him

And finally...

Revenge Killing

IN 1883, Henry Ziegland broke off a relationship with his girlfriend who committed suicide. The girl's enraged brother hunted down Ziegland and shot him. Believing he had killed Ziegland, the brother then took his own life. However Ziegland had not been killed. The bullet had only grazed his face, lodging into a tree. It was a narrow escape. Years later, Ziegland decided to cut down the same tree, which still had the bullet in it. The huge tree seemed so formiddable that he decided to blow it up with dynamite. The explosion propelled the bullet into Ziegland's head, killing him.